This Made-In-India Robot Does Not Run On A Software

Indians are known as coders the world over and the country is called the back-office to the world because of a strong software services industry that has grown over the last three decades.

India’s educational institutes are now trying to break the stereotype by starting research and incubation centres and push students to build technology-driven products. More than 8,000 students from colleges in the state showcased such products at a day-long conclave held on the 57th Maharashtra Day. BloombergQuint has picked three interesting prototypes...



Photographer: Vijay Sartape/BloombergQuint
Photographer: Vijay Sartape/BloombergQuint

Physical Coder Robot

Students from Thakur Polytechnic, Mumbai, have developed what they called the first Physical Coder Robot. It requires a manual input to generate a repetitive output, and does not run on a software.

The robot is best suited for repetitive tasks in factories and assembly-line productions, students from the institute said. With adequate research and funding, manual input could be converted to an automated one, they said.

They have received funding worth Rs 10 lakh and have signed up to launch a startup through Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s StartUp India initiative.

Photographer: Vijay Sartape/BloombergQuint
Photographer: Vijay Sartape/BloombergQuint

Digital Stethoscope

Researchers at the Biomedical Engineering and Technology Incubation Centre at the Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay have built a digital stethoscope that can amplify heart and lung sounds by up to 40 percent and record them. The stethoscope comes with Bluetooth connectivity and an SD slot to transfer recorded sounds to a mobile phone or a desktop.

The researchers said the recorded sounds could help in medical analysis. They are currently working with the Hinduja and Fortis hospitals to record samples.



Photographer: Vijay Sartape/BloombergQuint
Photographer: Vijay Sartape/BloombergQuint

Treadicle, The Treadmill Cycle

Two young men from KJ Somaiya College, Mumbai have designed a Treadicle–The Treadmill Cycle.

(Photographer: Vijay Sartape/BloombergQuint)
(Photographer: Vijay Sartape/BloombergQuint)

The Treadicle let’s you walk on the treadmill and cycle at the same time. Feet movement on the treadmill gets the Treadicle moving. A Holland-based company called Lopifit which has also developed a similar treadmill cycle.

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