Greene Walks Back Pro-QAnon Remarks Before House Vote

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Republican Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene said she regrets some of her past embrace or promotion of conspiracy theories and violence against Democrats in a speech on the House floor hours before Democrats were set to strip her of her two committee assignments.

The Georgia Republican on Thursday didn’t apologize or fully retract her past statements. She said if Congress wants “to condemn me and crucify me in the public square for words that I said and I regret a few years ago, then I think we are in for a real big problem.”

Greene walked back previous claims about the QAnon conspiracy theory, mass school shootings and the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the U.S.

“Our children are our future and they’re our most precious resource. I also want to tell you 9/11 absolutely happened,” Greene said in her remarks.

The speech echoed some of her comments in a closed GOP meeting Wednesday as she sought to shore up support among her fellow Republicans. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy declined to unilaterally remove her from the committees responsible for education and the budget. He said he takes her at her word that she understands the consequences of her actions now that she’s an elected member of Congress.

Greene, 46, has come under harsh criticism from some fellow Republicans, including Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell, who said “loony lies and conspiracy theories” are a “cancer” for the party and the country.

Greene said she “stumbled across” QAnon -- a conspiracy theory regarding an anonymous government official dropping hints to topple global power structures -- while using Google in 2017.

“I got very interested in it, so I posted about it on Facebook,“ Greene said. “I read about it. I talked about it.”

Greene said she became upset about things and didn’t trust the government -- “a lot of Americans don’t trust our government,” she said -- which led her to believe things that weren’t true.

However, Greene also complained about how she is portrayed in the media, which she said does not adequately describe who she is. She said she has “lived a very good life that I’m proud of. My family is proud of.” She accused the media of misrepresenting the truth.

“Shall we stay divided like this?” Greene asked her fellow representatives. “Will we allow that the media that is just as guilty as QAnon of presenting truth and lies to divide us?”

House Rules Committee Chairman Jim McGovern of Massachusetts said he did not hear an actual apology for some of her past beliefs or actions -- including joining in threats to kill elected Democrats and harassing survivors of school shootings.

“I did not hear an apology or disavowment for those things,” McGovern said on the House floor in response.

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